How to – Enable Alerts for Azure ExpressRoute

Azure ExpressRoute is Microsoft’s recommended method of accessing resources in Azure over a private connection. It is unique to the platform and can offer unparalleled resilience and performance. It also has the capability to allow you connect to Azure Public Resources, such as Storage Accounts, Azure SQL, over the same circuit and therefore, private connection.

With the above being possible, it’s clear that ExpressRoute, once implemented, becomes the key resource in your environment. As such, you would be wise to implement some level of monitoring and alerting for it.

Here, I’m going to show you how to very quickly put in place alerts should either of the required BGP sessions drop for your ExpressRoute circuit.

To add some context to that, each ExpressRoute circuit requires a pair of BGP sessions to meet SLA requirements. They will function with just one, but that’s not fully supported and definitely not recommended! So, presuming you have both active, we’ll base our alert off of that metric. We’re going to look specifically at Private Peering as it’s the most common implementation, but the logic is identical for Microsoft Peering.

If both are active and configured correctly, you should see the same routes being advertised within the circuit if you check your route table from the Peering blade

Next, let’s look at the Metric we will be using for the alert. In your ExpressRoute Circuit blade, choose Metrics. Then we’ll choose the ‘BGP Availability’ Metric and ensure Aggregation is ‘Avg’

Next, to future proof the alert, or if you have a Microsoft Peering, we’re going to apply some filtering. So choose ‘Add filter’ (highlighted above). Then we’re going to select the ‘Peering Type’ Property, and choose ‘private’ from the Values drop down and click the tiny blue tick to the right (You won’t see Microsoft if you don’t have one, but do this anyway to ensure your alert is tightly scoped).

Now, we’re looking at the average BGP availability, for our Private Peering only.

To make life easier, you can now just click ‘New Alert Rule’ on the top right to use this scoped metric for your alert.

This applies the right resource scope and brings the metric across too, you now just have to configure some of the required choices on specifics.

First up, let’s confirm the condition and signal logic. Click on the blue text under Condition. You will see Private is already selected for you. I’m going to change Operator to ‘less than or equal to’ and add a value of 95.

The above settings mean that the BGP Availability metric for my private peering, over the last 5 minutes, will be assessed every minute. Should it drop below or equal to 95%, an alert will fire. You can adjust this as needed to suit your own environment.

Now, we need to define what happens when they alert fires. Click Done on the signal logic pop out, this will bring you back to the alert configuration blade.

I would recommend you create and use an Action Group, even something simple like a distribution group to email. More on Action Groups – https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/azure-monitor/platform/action-groups

Next, define the final details for the alert. Use a descriptive name and the appropriate severity for your environment/system.

Now, the alert itself can take some time to become fully active, so I would recommend waiting about thirty minutes before attempting a test. But, please ensure you test the alert!

And that’s it. Once tested, you have now setup a fully scoped alert rule for your ExpressRoute Private Peering. You can repeat the above, and change the scope to Microsoft Peering to cover that too if you have it.

As always, if there are any questions, get in touch!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s