How To – Confirm and Enable Azure Resource Providers

Depending on your level of permission on an Azure subscription, you may or may not have encountered Resource Providers directly. However, when you do, they can be a bit tricky. This post will hopefully clear up some of the most common issues and help you get working that bit quicker.

First up, what is an Azure Resource Provider? Simply put, it is a service within Azure Resource Manager that provides the resources you build. An example is Microsoft.Network which provides Virtual Networks among many others.

By default, if you have the correct role at a subscription level, Resource Providers are automatically registered. However, to register you need either Contributor, Owner, or a Custom Role with permission to do the /register/action operation. Resource Providers are always at subscription level and once registered, you can’t unregister when you still have resource types from that Resource Provider in your subscription.

So, in a scenario where you have an Owner role but only on a Resource Group within a subscription, you do not have permission to register Resource Providers.

Next, how do I check which Resource Providers are registered? There are a couple of ways to achieve this. You can simply check within the Portal, which gives some nice immediate visuals. Head to the Azure Portal, and navigate to your subscription. Scroll down to the Settings section and choose Resource Providers.

From here you can see a list of Registered, NotRegistered, and Registering providers. To register, simply click the relevant provider and choose Register at the top of the list. Similar for unregister once the previously mentioned caveat is met.

In some cases, you may want to avoid issues with NotRegistered providers and want to Register them all for a subscription. This can be achieved via the shell.

Log into Azure Powershell and choose your required subscription. Next run the following:

Get-AzResourceProvider -ListAvailable | Select-Object ProviderNamespace, RegistrationState

This will list all resource providers, and the registration status for your subscription. You can get additional details on each provider including resources it supports and locations supported by running the commands detailed in this doc.

To register all providers at once, run the following:

Get-AzResourceProvider -ListAvailable | Register-AzResourceProvider

The shell will then cycle through all providers and list their status as it works its way through them all. Similar to below:

And that’s it! You now know how to check the status of your Resource Providers and how to enable them as needed. As usual, I can’t take any responsibility for commands provided in examples, please use at your own risk. But, if there are any questions, please get in touch!

AZ-303: Microsoft Azure Architect Technologies (beta) – Study Guide

Microsoft continues to update it’s role based exams and next on the list is AZ-303. This is the updated version of AZ-300 and should launch at the end of June 2020. Currently this is arguably the most difficult exam certification path as it is one of only two Expert level certifications for Azure. This post will cover AZ-303 and here is what Microsoft have to say about it:

Candidates for this exam are Azure Solutions Architects who advise stakeholders and translate business requirements into secure, scalable, and reliable solutions. Candidates should have advanced experience and knowledge of IT operations, including networking, virtualization, identity, security, business continuity, disaster recovery, data platform, budgeting, and governance. This role requires managing how decisions in each area affects an overall solution. Candidates must have expert-level skills in Azure administration and have experience with Azure development processes and DevOps processes.

As the exam is still in beta, if you take it, it will not be scored immediately. So bear that in mind before you sit it! Of course, if you pass the exam, once scored, it will count towards the certification.

If you do want to sit the exam and register before August 10th 2020, there are 300 discounted exams on offer if you use the code – AZ303DonSuperStar

As always, a great place to start is Microsoft Learn. There are several interactive learning paths that are free that you can work through at your own pace. I find this a great way to study and gain greater understanding of the services by actually using them and you will need to be very familiar with Azure to pass this exam.

Below I’ve put together a collection of links relevant to the sections Microsoft have highlighted as being part of the skills measured for this exam. These are only guide links, sometimes you need to explore a topic much more deeply if you are not familiar with it. Hopefully these study materials will help guide you to successfully passing AZ-303!

Implement and Monitor an Azure Infrastructure (50-55%)

Implement cloud infrastructure monitoring

Implement storage accounts

Implement VMs for Windows and Linux

Automate deployment and configuration of resources

Implement virtual networking

Implement Azure Active Directory

Implement and manage hybrid identities

Implement Management and Security Solutions (25-30%)

Manage workloads in Azure

Implement load balancing and network security

Implement and manage Azure governance solutions

Manage security for applications

Implement Solutions for Apps (10-15%)

Implement an application infrastructure

Implement container-based applications

Implement and Manage Data Platforms (10-15%)

Implement NoSQL databases

Implement Azure SQL databases

How To – Convert Azure Managed Disk Performance SKU

Due to some of the recent restrictions within Azure on deployments, some of you may have had to deploy VM sizes that were not idea, or didn’t exactly fit your needs. As part of that, you may have had to limit your choice in Managed Disk SKU too.

For example, I had to deploy a D8v3 for a customer and use Standard SSD until restrictions were lifted. I have no change the VM SKU to D8Sv3 and the disks to Premium SSD. For some people this is just about performance, but don’t forget, the financial SLA for VMs requires they run Premium SSD Managed Disks. Another solid reason to use them!

So, if you find yourself in a situation where you need to change the SKU, how can you do it? There are two ways I recommend, both require the VM to be deallocated so you may have to plan an outage, however the process is quick, so just a short one should be required.

Method 1: Via the Portal

This works best for individual, or a small number of VMs.

So, first up, if your VM needs to be resized to support Premium SSD, you should do that. Via the Portal, you simply stop the VM, choose your new size, and apply. One tip however, on the overview page of the VM blade, ensure you hit refresh so that the updated size is shown. For some reason, the Disk blade needs that to show that correctly or you cannot update your Disk SKU.

Next, choose the Disk blade, and select the disk you want to change. Click the Configuration option and simply choose the correct SKU from the drop down menu. This works for moving between any SKU by the way, as long as the VM size supports. Make sure to click Save.

Now, back to your VM blade, click Start and you’re done! VM and Disk updated.

Method 1: Via the Shell

This works best if you need to make multiple changes at once, save some time. As always with my shell examples, I am using Powershell, but the same actions can be carried out with CLI.

The below shows how to switch all Disks for a VM between tiers. In this example, we’re changing them to Premium, you can change that with the $storageType variable. Note, the below will Stop the VM for you and start it again. The VM must be running a Size that supports Premium in advance.

# Name of the resource group that contains the VM
$rgName = 'yourResourceGroup'

# Name of the your virtual machine
$vmName = 'yourVM'

# Choose between Standard_LRS and Premium_LRS based on your scenario
$storageType = 'Premium_LRS'

# Stop and deallocate the VM before changing the size
Stop-AzVM -ResourceGroupName $rgName -Name $vmName -Force

# Get all disks in the resource group of the VM
$vmDisks = Get-AzDisk -ResourceGroupName $rgName 

# For disks that belong to the selected VM, convert to Premium storage
foreach ($disk in $vmDisks)
{
	if ($disk.ManagedBy -eq $vm.Id)
	{
		$disk.Sku = [Microsoft.Azure.Management.Compute.Models.DiskSku]::new($storageType)
		$disk | Update-AzDisk
	}
}

Start-AzVM -ResourceGroupName $rgName -Name $vmName

And that’s it, you’re done!

The above example code was taken and edited slightly from the Docs article on this. The article includes multiple options for changing between tiers, single disks vs multiple etc. Check it out here – https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/virtual-machines/windows/convert-disk-storage

Global Azure Virtual 2020

As a result of the current global health crisis, the Global Azure events have moved entirely online. Spread over three days (23rd-25th April) it promises to be an amazing mix of content from contributors from all corners of the world.

In the UK & Ireland, we have a local event. Organised by a great team, all of the details are here – https://azureglobalbootcamp2020.azurewebsites.net/

There is a mix of live, and pre-recorded sessions with a wide range of topics.

I’ve contributed a session myself, pre-recorded, on Azure Foundations. If anyone you know is looking to make a start on Azure, have them check it out! #GlobalAzureVirtual

How to – Use Azure Firewall IP Groups

If you’re familiar with Azure Firewall you would know that the introduction of an IP Group resource is most welcome. IP Groups are still in preview at the moment, so as usual be cautious on production environments as there is no SLA. However, it’s always nice to try out a service to see if it can work for you, or make your life easier.

IP Groups themselves are a relatively simple resource. They can contain a single IP address, multiple IP addresses, or one or more IP address ranges. They can then be used for DNAT, Network, or Application rules in Azure Firewall.

They currently have some interesting limitations that are a little bit confusing at first. From Docs:

For 50 IP Groups or less, you can have a maximum of 5000 individual IP addresses each per firewall instance. For 51 to 100 IP Groups, you can have 500 individual IP address each per firewall instance.

What this means is that while your rules should already be scoped accurately, you may need to use a couple of extra IP groups if you’re working with large address ranges. A simple example is a /16 will simply not work in an IP Group, /20 is basically your limit per IP Group.

I actually tried this on my own sub and it appears to actually work for now. Expect that to change as preview progresses.

If you’ve worked with Azure Firewall, I’m sure you’ve already thought of several places these rules can really help. For me, it was within Network Rule Collections.

However, as the service is in preview, there are a few aspects to be ironed out. Unfortunately, one of those is the ability to add an IP Group as a destination within a network rule when using the Portal. See below

UPDATE: As expected, this is now resolved! However, read on to see how to do this at scale.

At this point, I am going to flag extreme caution if your Azure Firewall is in production and you are trying this. It is very easy to overwrite all of your collections, take your time and export them before making any changes!

I’m a Windows guy, so I’m going to explain how to do this with Powershell, but it also works for CLI. Similarly, I’m showing a Network Rule, same process works for Application Rules.

First up, you need to all of the details for your Azure Firewall as we will work with it’s config as a variable and finally update it.

#Get the AFW I want to edit
$afw = Get-AzFirewall -Name wda-afw-test -ResourceGroupName rg-wda-afw

#Save current Network Rule Collection to a variable for reference
$oldcol = $afw.NetworkRuleCollections

#Get the IP Group I want to use
$ipg = Get-AzIpGroup -Name wda-group1 -ResourceGroupName rg-wda-afw

#Create my new network rule
$newrule = New-AzFirewallNetworkRule -Name "rule2" -Protocol TCP -SourceAddress * -DestinationIpGroup $ipg.Id -DestinationPort 445

Now this is where it can get a bit tricky. Collections are stored as nested arrays. My AFW has two collections, I want to add my new rule to the second one which means I need to reference index 1. See the collections below, the one we’ll be editing is “collection2” which currently only has “rule2”

#view all collections
$afw.NetworkRuleCollections

#view the specific collection rules using place in array
$afw.NetworkRuleCollections[1].Rules | ft

#add my new rule to my collection
$afw.NetworkRuleCollections[1].AddRule($newrule)

#if you like, check it has updated as desired
$afw.NetworkRuleCollections[1].Rules | ft

#If as expected, update AFW
Set-AzFirewall -AzureFirewall $afw

The last command can take a minute or two to complete. Once it has, you can see the rule is now added to my collection2. The Portal will display it correctly, but you cannot edit correctly with the glitch.

And that’s it! You’ve successfully added an IP Group as a destination to your Azure Firewall. Again, please be careful, the above is only a guide and I cannot be responsible for your Azure Firewall 🙂