What is Azure Network Security Group?

If you’re considering Azure for IaaS workloads, the first aspect of cloud you will have to understand, design and deploy is networking. As with any other cloud, software defined networking is the foundation of IaaS for Azure.

You cannot deploy a workload without first deploying a Virtual Network. However, once you have a network, you then need to consider its security and specifically how you control its perimeter and access. The perimeter is something that requires its own post but for platform-native, have a look at Azure Firewall and for other topics, start by checking out the Security Center docs for an overview.

When it comes to access control on your Virtual Network, Azure offers built-in solutions for both network layer control and route control. Network Security Groups (NSG) function as the network layer control service. So, what are they and how do you use them?

NSGs filter traffic to and from resources in an Azure Virtual Network. Combining rules that allow or deny traffic for both inbound and outbound traffic, allows granular control at the network layer.

They can be viewed as a basic, stateful, packet filtering firewall, but what does that mean? First, lets note what they don’t do; there is no traffic inspection or authentication access control.

So how do they help secure your network? By combining 5 variables into a scenario which you then allow or deny, you can quickly and easily manipulate the access that is possible to your resource. For example, consider the following two rules:

PriorityPortProtocolSourceDestinationAccess
1003389TCP10.10.10.10*Allow
200****Block

Our first rule, allows RDP traffic to the resources protected by the NSG, but only from the scoped source IP. The second rule, blocks all traffic. The rules are processed in order or priority.

Source and Destination can use IPs, IP ranges, ANY or Service Tags. Service Tags really help you define simple but powerful access rules quickly. For example, consider the following change to our above rules:

PriorityPortProtocolSourceDestinationAccess
1003389TCP10.10.10.10*Allow
101443TCPVirtualNetwork*Allow
200****Block

We still allow RDP and we still block all traffic, however, we now also allow HTTPS traffic from any source tagged as VirtualNetwork. This includes everything in your Virtual Network, any peered Virtual Networks and any traffic originating across a VPN or ExpressRoute. A single Service Tag replaces multiple source ranges and simplifies management.

If you’re still struggling with the filtering aspect, check out this handy tutorial from Docs.

A couple of other items to note about NSGs; they can be applied to a Network Interface or a Subnet and they have some default rules. Which layer you apply an NSG to is important. Remember traffic is processed inbound and outbound in reversed layers. So traffic from a VM out hits Network Interface then Subnet. So how you scope and combine NSGs is critical to ensuring your access control is as you want it. There is a great example of this on Docs.

The default rules that exist within an NSG allow Virtual Network traffic IN and Internet traffic OUT. You can check out the full list for exact details.

As always, if you have any questions or require a steer on a specific scenario, please get in touch!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s